2021 NFL Draft Scouting Report: Whop Philyor

2021 NFL Draft Scouting Report: Whop Philyor

by April 25, 2021 0 comments

Whop Philyor is a receiver, whose name has not been mentioned much among national news outlets, but he has received plenty of attention among draft groups. He can provide intriguing value from the slot in the later rounds. Let’s take a look at his skill set.

Make sure to check out all of our other 2021 NFL Draft Scouting Reports.

Player Bio

Name: Mister Elias De’Angel “Whop” Philyor

Jersey: #1

Position: Wide Receiver

School: Indiana

Class: Senior

Height: 5’10”

Weight: 184 lbs

Speed (5/10)

Philyor has the average speed for a wide receiver, but is agile and has good acceleration. He spent most of his time at Indiana playing out of the slot and will likely do so in the NFL as well so he will not need to have elite speed in the NFL. Philyor ran a 4.57 40 during his pro day.

Athleticism (7/10)

Philyor is an athletic wide receiver. He used his athleticism in college to gain separation from defenders when running routes since his route tree is fairly limited. Philyor also was able to use his athleticism and agility after the catch to make big plays.

After the Catch (9/10)

Philyor is incredible after the catch. He uses a combination of athleticism and agility to make big plays after the catch. Philyor was used for many screen passes at Indiana due to his tremendous ability to create after he catches the pass.

Fluidity (8.25/10)

Philyor is a very fluid wide receiver. Although he is not the fastest, all of his moves are fluid, allowing him to make the most of every step he takes.

Route Running/Separation (3/10)

At Indiana, Philyor ran a limited route tree often running screens or stick routes. He was very good at finding holes in zone coverage and being able to get open using the limited routes he has available but will need to expand his route tree in the NFL.

Hands (6.5/10)

Philyor had multiple drops throughout his collegiate career but was also able to make many outstanding catches. Philyor displayed the ability to correct poor quarterback play at times but will need to improve his consistency.

Contested Catch (1/10)

One of the most nonexistent parts of Philyor’s game is the contested catch. As a slot receiver, he was not needed to make many contested catches and has not shown the ability to do so. Former NFL coach Jim Mora said this about Philyor, “They’re going to have concerns about his weight and his ability to make contested catches.”

Release (7.5/10)

Philyor has a solid release. He uses his good burst off the line of scrimmage to get past defenders and find the open holes in coverage.

Strength (6/10)

He has sneaky strength for a player that weighs around 184 lbs. Philyor was asked many times to block at Indiana and he was successful doing so. On his pro day, Philyor completed 14 bench press which is around the average for wide receivers.

Blocking (4/5)

Philyor was tasked to block many times during his collegiate career and he did it well. He blocks with aggression and explosiveness, but can often get beat due to his lack of size. Philyor can improve his mechanics as a blocker but has potential in this area at the next level.

Injury (4/5)

Philyor faced an injury in 2018 which caused him to miss a portion of the season, but the injury sheet has been pretty clean for him.

Player Summary

If Philyor is available in the later rounds teams with a need for a slot receiver could take a look at him. He is great at finding open holes in zone coverage and making plays after the catch that will likely be a backup in the NFL.

Final Grade (53.75/100): Undrafted Free Agent


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Kamran Nia is a journalist from Los Angeles, California.

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