Breaking Down the Mets’ 2020 Draft Class

Breaking Down the Mets’ 2020 Draft Class

by June 12, 2020 0 comments

The Mets held six selections in the 2020 MLB Draft, which took place this past Wednesday and Thursday. Here is a breakdown of the six newest members of New York’s farm system.

Round 1, Pick 19: Pete Crow-Armstrong

With the 19th overall pick, the Mets selected left-handed outfielder Pete Crow-Armstrong out of Harvard-Westlake High School in Los Angeles, Calif.

The former Vanderbilt commit is 18 years old, stands at 6-foot-1, and weighs in at 175 pounds. He hit .514 in his pandemic-shortened high school senior season while running the 60-yard dash in an impressive 6.51 seconds. He also threw 93 MPH from the outfield.

Crow-Armstrong already possesses solid power and stands to gain even more as he grows and fills out his frame.

In this year’s draft, many teams opted to favor college players over high schoolers due to the uncertainty caused by canceled seasons, but Crow-Armstrong is a legitimate five-tool threat.

As one of the best prep school outfielders in the draft, he was too good to pass on.

Round 2, Pick 52: J.T. Ginn

With the 52nd pick, the Mets selected right-handed pitcher J.T. Ginn out of Mississippi State University.

The Starkville Mississippi native is 21 years old, stands at 6-foot-2, and weighs 200 pounds. His collegiate ERA was 3.22, his fastball tops at 97 MPH, and he possesses a plus slider.

This isn’t Ginn’s first time being drafted, as he was selected 30th overall out of high school by the Dodgers in 2018. The former SEC freshman of the year saw his draft stock fall after he tore his UCL this March, but the Mets have plenty of experience with post-Tommy John pitchers and should be able to get Ginn back to where he was.

The righty is a high upside pick who, at 21 years old, could make a big-league impact sooner rather than later.

Compensation Round, Pick 69: Isaiah Greene

With the 69th overall pick, the Mets selected Californian left-handed outfielder Isaiah Greene out of Corona High School.

The former Missouri commit is 18 years old, 6-foot-1, and 178 pounds. Greene has room to develop at the plate with an exit velocity of only 88 MPH, but his 60-yard dash time of 6.48 seconds shows that he’s already capable of running the bases at an elite level and covering enough ground required to play center field professionally.

The biggest question with Greene is whether or not the Mets will be able to sign him as he could opt to develop his skills further and attend college.

Round 3, Pick 91: Anthony Walters

With the 91st overall pick, the Mets selected San Diego State shortstop Anthony Walters. 

The collegiate infielder is 22 years old, 6-foot-1, and 185 pounds. He previously played at the University of California and Mt. San Antonio College, batting a combined .310 throughout his college career.

Walters was not on many people’s radar before the draft but clearly, the Mets see something they like in him; they clearly think the 22-year-old can contribute to the big-league team soon due to his strong hitting and positional versatility in the infield.

Round 4, Pick 120: Matthew Dyer

With the 120th selection, the Mets drafter catcher Matthew Dyer from the University of Arizona.

Dyer 21 years old, stands at 6-foot-4, and weighs 174 pounds. He previously played at the University of Oregon with a combined collegiate batting average of .316.

Dyer, a primary catcher, has the potential to play all over the field and possibly fill a utility role for the Mets. Like Walters before him, Dyer wasn’t on many people’s radar pre-draft. The probable reason for picking these two relative unknowns is to ensure that they have the money to sign their first three picks.

Roundn 5, Pick 150: Eric Orze

With the 150th overall pick, the Mets selected right-handed pitcher Eric Orze out of the University of New Orleans.

The Carol Stream, Ill., native is 22 years old, stands at 6-foot-3, and weighs 185 pounds. He was 3-0 with a 2.75 ERA in his shortened senior season; his fastball tops out at about 94 MPH while off-speed pitches are his bread and butter. He throws a splitter, slider, and cutter.

Orze has had more than his fair share of adversity, beating cancer twice already and coming back better than ever.

The former Privateer is once again an unranked player that the Mets may have been targeting partially for signability in addition to his resilience and prowess on the mound.

 

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