Krug Would Take Hometown Discount

Photo Credit: NBC Sports

The Boston Bruins haven’t re-signed two important restricted free agent defenseman in Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo. However, they have to start thinking about the 2020 contracts as soon as possible. The most notable impending 2020 free agent for the Bruins is Torey Krug.

Krug has collected 163 points over his past three seasons. He has always reached at least 50 points in one regular season, despite some minor injuries. During 2018’s Cup Final run, the American defenseman has gathered 16 points. He is due to get a significant raise from his $5.25 million salary. But, can the Bruins actually afford it?

Taking a quick look at the Boston Bruins salary cap situation in 2020, right now Boston has a sum of approximately $35 million to work with. If Krug is a priority, Boston has to get him signed. There is no way the Bruins shouldn’t re-sign him if he is their priority. As it happens, Krug’s priority is to stay with the Bruins as well. He has never hidden his intentions.

“I’m pretty sure my teammates would love me to come back. My coach I know for a fact loves the way I play. This last playoffs was big for me and my development and my growth. I feel like I’m just hitting my prime,” Krug said in an interview with the ESPN.

Krug is hitting his prime and if a player like Erik Karlsson got $11.5 million or Drew Doughty got $11 million…Krug is going to be paid as well.

There is no hiding here, Krug loves to be a Bruin. But, if there are any complications, would he take a hometown discount? Of course, Krug would get a suitor paying him more than the Bruins would will to.

“Would I take less to stay in Boston, it’s something that I’ve talked about with my family and my agent. It’s something I’m interested in. How much less—that’s a question that will be answered at a certain time,” Krug said. “As long as they want me, I think something could be done, realistically.”

It’s a surprising quote a year before Krug might hit free agency. However, it’s not going to be a similar situation to the one of Brad Marchand, who signed his eight-year deal worth $6.125 million per season a year before hitting the UFA market.

“Marchy is way too low because he signed one year too early,” Krug said.

Cautious or not, Krug’s preference is to stay with the Bruins. And he is willing to sign for less than what he would have earned somewhere else. That’s a good sign, as he fits Bruce Cassidy’s system perfectly and the Bruins want him too.

Would this situation somehow shake his upcoming season?

“My first three deals were all one-year deals. I’m used to it. I’m used to having to prove myself,” Krug said, who added that he loves the situation he is in.

A year before possible contract extension drama, the chances of the 28-year-old staying in Boston look rosy.

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