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The Red Sox Broke an Unlikely Record in August

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Michael Dwyer

The Red Sox faced off against the Baltimore Orioles on Aug. 25 at Fenway Park and were blown out 16-3. There really was not much for the Sox to celebrate in this game, as they allowed 20 hits and made five errors on top of the 16 runs allowed.

The only truly exciting moment for the fans came in the top of the ninth inning when first baseman Mitch Moreland took to the mound and pitched the final inning for the Sox. This pitching changed ended up earning the Red Sox an unlikely accolade, and one they probably did not want.

When the Sox moved Moreland from first base to the pitcher’s mound, they needed to bring in a new first baseman. Then manager John Farrell did the sensible thing and subbed Hanley Ramirez in for the designated hitter Chris Young. Moreland pitched out of the inning, and the Sox went into the bottom of the ninth looking to end what had been a miserable game.

Rafael Devers lead off and lined out, meaning Ramirez was now up to bat. Ramirez was not in the on-deck circle, however, and did not bat. Instead Young went up to bat and singled.

This should not have happened.

Young was no longer in the game, as Ramirez had subbed in for him, yet he still went up to bat and got a hit. No one noticed, not the managers nor the broadcasters nor the umpires, but in the end, no one probably cared. They all probably wanted to go home.

It was here where the Red Sox broke the record for the first illegal lineup reentry in MLB history. Per MLB rules, since Ramirez had replaced Young in the field, Ramirez was supposed to go up to bat, but this was apparently lost in translation amongst the Red Sox dugout staff.

Young’s reentry into the game was illegal, and Red Sox manager John Farrell later admitted that Ramirez should have hit for Young in that situation. Orioles manager Buck Showalter did not protest Young reentering the game either, as with his team up by 13 runs, he probably just wanted to go back to the team’s hotel.

It is almost sad that such a historic event for the sport of baseball went unnoticed by so many people, from the fans to the managers and even to the umpires.

While the Red Sox’s season last year ended in dreary fashion, at least they can rest easy knowing they had a record-breaking season.

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Kyle Bray is the Editor in Chief at Prime Time Sports Talk and a freshman journalism major at Emerson College. He also serves as the sports editor for the Bay State Herald and the deputy sports editor for The Berkeley Beacon. Aside from his editing duties at Prime Time Sports Talk, he is the lead New England Revolution writer, the Holy Cross Men's Basketball reporter, and is a member of the Prime Time Sports Talk radio team. He grew up just outside of Boston and has been a Boston sports fan all his life.

About Kyle Bray (92 Articles)
Kyle Bray is the Editor in Chief at Prime Time Sports Talk and a freshman journalism major at Emerson College. He also serves as the sports editor for the Bay State Herald and the deputy sports editor for The Berkeley Beacon. Aside from his editing duties at Prime Time Sports Talk, he is the lead New England Revolution writer, the Holy Cross Men's Basketball reporter, and is a member of the Prime Time Sports Talk radio team. He grew up just outside of Boston and has been a Boston sports fan all his life.

1 Comment on The Red Sox Broke an Unlikely Record in August

  1. Zack Taylor of the cubs re-entered a game in the 1930s.

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