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Keeping up With Trot Nixon

Photo Credit: Unkown

Trot Nixon was a staple for the Red Sox in right field from 1999-2006 and was a part of the legendary team that “reversed the curse” for the Boston Red Sox.

Nixon was selected seventh overall in the first round of the 1993 MLB Draft by the Red Sox at the age of 19. The young outfielder, however, didn’t get his chance at the bigs until he was 22 when he played just two games in the show.

Nixon didn’t see the MLB again until he was 24 when he played just 13 games. The year he broke out with a career year in 2003 when he batted .306 with 28 home runs.

In 2004, the right fielder missed many months of play due to injury, but played the rest of the regular season and all of the post season playing a big part of winning the clubs first World Series in 86 years. His most notable moment of that postseason was during Game 4 of the World Series in St. Louis against the Cardinals when he hit a two-out double in the third inning to give Boston a 3-0 lead that would help win the game.

Nixon played 978 games for the club during his tenure along with batting .278 and hitting 133 home runs. He did not win any accolades aside from winning the World Series, but he will always be remembered as a part of the great 2004 Red Sox team.

In 2007, Nixon signed with the Cleveland Indians on a one-year contract. He played where 99 games for the Tribe. In 2008, he signed with the Arizona Diamondbacks, who then dealt him to the New York Mets. He played many games in the minors with both of these teams until he signed with the Milwaukee Brewers and was put on the inactive roster.

In 2009, Nixon retired from baseball.

The lefty doesn’t play a whole lot baseball anymore and lives a relatively private life. At 43 years old, he has two sons and a wife and lives in North Carolina. He hosts a show on WWAY-TV called, “The 5th Quarter” where he runs highlights for high school football, considering he is a high school football legend in North Carolina.

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